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ISRI recognizes recycling industry veterans

ISRI recognizes recycling industry veterans
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Pictured above from left: Herschel Cutler, ISRI Chair Mark Lewon and Crawford Carpenter

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, has recognized Dr. Herschel Cutler, the organization’s first executive director, and Crawford Carpenter, who recently retired from Caraustar Industries, with 2017 Lifetime Achievement Awards. The men were presented with their awards during ISRI’s annual convention and exposition in New Orleans in late April.

Carpenter received the award for his lifetime of dedication to the education and preparation of the next generation recyclers, researchers and citizens, while Cutler received the award for his commitment to his family, his community and his many friends and colleagues in the recycling industry, ISRI says.

Before entering the recycling industry, Cutler received a PhD from Syracuse University. He spent two years in the Army as a general’s aide in Washington before becoming a full-time faculty member at The American University and starting a private consulting practice. His first client was the Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel, one of ISRI’s predecessor organizations. In 1971, Cutler was selected as the organization’s new executive director. He began to address the industry’s biggest challenges of the 1970s, including discriminatory railroad freight rates burdening ferrous scrap. He also led a fight with parts of the steel industry over ferrous scrap export controls. His efforts on the Hill and in a series of field hearings around the country helped pass legislation and develop regulations that have protected the industry from export controls ever since.

In 1987, the Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel and the National Association of Recycling Industries agreed to merge and to form ISRI. Cutler was designated as the executive director of the newly formed organization. Throughout the 1990s, Cutler fought for the Superfund Recycling Equity Act (SREA), which provides relief to recyclers from the Superfund legislation passed in 1980 that threatened the industry. Under his direction, the recycling industry was able to declare victory in 1999, ISRI says.

After serving as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, and receiving master’s degree in business from the University of Wisconsin in 1971, Carpenter began his career in the recycling industry. He joined the Container Corp. of America (CCA) as an internal auditor. He quickly rose through the ranks at CCA to become division controller for its Paper Stock Division. Shortly after CCA was acquired by Smurfit in 1986, he moved to Gaylord Container Corp. and was ultimately recruited to join The Newark Group. At The Newark Group, which was later purchased by Caraustar, Carpenter became heavily involved in ISRI and the Paper Stock Industries (PSI) Chapter.

He moved up the association ladder, serving as PSI Chapter president, ISRI board member, Paper Division board member, Recycling Research Foundation president, and Education and Training Committee vice chair. Throughout his time with ISRI, Carpenter devoted his time and energy to educating future generations about recycling. He helped lead the organization’s youth educational outreach and curriculum development through the JASON Project. Carpenter also helped to expand and promote the Recycling Research Foundation Scholarship program and to create a National Veterans Stipend, to assist veterans in furthering their education.

Regarding Carpenter, Robin Weiner, ISRI president, says his “passion for education and for the recycling industry creates a true legacy within the industry. Thanks in part to his efforts, millions of students are now receiving ISRI’s recycling curriculum as part of their K-12 education. Hundreds have received financial support needed to go to college because of Crawford’s energy and determination in promoting the Recycling Research Foundation and Paper Stock Industries scholarship programs. It was also his vision that led to the creation of the national veterans’ stipend program, providing educational support to those who served in our military. A whole new generation is better aware of our industry, and many will see jobs in recycling because of what they learned from or due to Crawford.”

Of Cutler, Weiner says, he “was more than just a leader, he was the heart and soul of ISRI and the entire recycling industry and a mentor for many of us on staff. Herschel fought some of the biggest public policy battles this industry has ever faced and in many regards saved recycling from regulatory destruction. Without Herschel, the industry would not be the economic driver and global leader it is today.”

She adds, “On a personal note, I feel very lucky to have had Herschel as my teacher and friend for so many years. He taught me much of what I know about the industry and, for all that and much, much more, I will be forever grateful.”

Cutler, who retired from ISRI in 2001, says, “Whatever successes this award credits to me were made possible by the commitment of the members, an incredibly dedicated leadership corps and an amazing staff.”

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Source: Recycling Today
ISRI recognizes recycling industry veterans
<![CDATA[Pictured above from left: Herschel Cutler, ISRI Chair Mark Lewon and Crawford CarpenterThe Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, has recognized Dr. Herschel Cutler, the organization’s first executive director, and Crawford Carpenter, who recently retired from Caraustar Industries, with 2017 Lifetime Achievement Awards. The men were presented with their awards during ISRI’s annual convention and exposition in New Orleans in late April. Carpenter received the award for his lifetime of dedication to the education and preparation of the next generation recyclers, researchers and citizens, while Cutler received the award for his commitment to his family, his community and his many friends and colleagues in the recycling industry, ISRI says. Before entering the recycling industry, Cutler received a PhD from Syracuse University. He spent two years in the Army as a general’s aide in Washington before becoming a full-time faculty member at The American University and starting a private consulting practice. His first client was the Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel, one of ISRI’s predecessor organizations. In 1971, Cutler was selected as the organization’s new executive director. He began to address the industry’s biggest challenges of the 1970s, including discriminatory railroad freight rates burdening ferrous scrap. He also led…

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